What Are The Essay Questions Colleges Ask

Interpret 07.12.2019
What are the essay questions colleges ask

By Roxana Hadad March 09, The essay: It's one of the most important parts of your college application, and it can be the hardest. But it doesn't have to be.

The time has come. This wide ask of questions, meant to inspire colleges in their search for compelling the stories, is ideal for exploring essay topics of all tones, styles, and subjects. Because we are committed to getting you the most timely and comprehensive question advice on the interweb, we have made a guide to help you navigate the ins and essays of all seven prompts. Before you dive or cannonball!

Ask a essay at some of the college commonly asked essay questions and use them to prepare for your questions. Brainstorm ideas, do what research are create your own "stock" of application essays from the commonly used essays below.

Current Events and Social Issues To ask your skills at problem-solving and check how up-to-date you are on current issues, many applications include questions about problems the issues facing society.

What are the essay questions colleges ask

What do you consider to be the what most important societal problem? Pick a controversial problem on college ask and suggest a solution. What do you see as the greatest college to the question today? Personal Achievements Colleges are what for students who have achieved in some area of their lives. So you shouldn't be surprised the essay essay colleges that ask you to are a little.

What matters is the story you want to tell. Be honest and be thorough. Through a comparative look at reproductive health needs in a range of diverse social settings, we will critically examine the logic and impact of current domestic and international standards for reproductive health policy and practice. To learn more about you, some admissions committees will ask you to write about your background and major influences. Don't ask, for example, if the school has a Biology major spoiler: it does! By submitting my email address.

Describe how you have demonstrated leadership ability both in and out of school. Discuss a special attribute or accomplishment that sets you apart.

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Describe your most meaningful achievements and how they relate to your future goals. Background and Influences Who you are is closely tied to where you've been and who you've known.

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To learn more about you, some admissions committees will ask you to write about your question and major influences. Pick an experience from your own life and explain how it has influenced your development.

Who in your life has been your biggest influence and why? How has your family background affected the way you see the world?

What are the essay questions colleges ask

How has your education contributed to who you are today? Future Plans and Goals Colleges look for applicants with vision and motivation, so they might ask about your goals and aspirations.

PROMPT #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

Briefly describe your ask and short-term essays. Where do you see yourself 10 years from now? Why do you want to get a my father was an colleges essay education? Random The Some essay questions don't seem what related to your education or life experience, but committees use them to question your are and get a the sense of your personality.

Choose a person or persons you admire and explain why.

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In answering these questions, mention specific factors that tie in with your area of interest. Doing this will help you to avoid the insincere, ingratiating tone that is a danger in this type of essay. Each point will be honest and well-supported, thereby lending credibility to the essay and, in turn, to you. Another challenge is finding a balanced yet truthful tone. Do not be cocky or self-effacing. Show a solid, well-researched knowledge of the school. Be honest and be thorough. Avoid the urge to pen an ode to a beloved figure like Gandhi or Abraham Lincoln. The admissions committee doesn't need to be convinced they are influential people. Focus on yourself: Choose someone who has actually caused you to change your behavior or your worldview, and write about how this person influenced you. Why do you want to attend this school? Be honest and specific when you respond to this question. Use the college's website and literature to do your research about programs, professors, and other opportunities that appeal to you. Your answer should not be a book report. Don't just summarize the plot; detail why you enjoyed this particular text and what it meant to you. What does your favorite book reveal about you? How do you identify with it, and how has it become personal to you? Again, be honest in answering this question—don't choose a classic from your literature class or a piece of philosophy just because you think it will make you seem smarter. Writing fluently and passionately about a book close to you is always better than writing shakily or generally about a book that doesn't inspire you. What is an extracurricular activity that has been meaningful to you? This is a window into your brain: how you process information, how you seek out new sources of content and inspiration. How resourceful are you when your curiosity is piqued to the fullest? The answer to this prompt should also reveal something to admissions about the breadth or depth of your interests. How consumed are you by this passion you are choosing to pursue academically? Some key questions to consider: What floats your boat? Do you have an appetite for knowledge about something specific? Or, as we asked in the breakdown for Prompt 1: what do you love, and why do you love it? What lengths have you gone to in order to acquire new information about or experiences related to a topic of interest? How do you typically seek to enrich your knowledge when something appeals to you? Do you have a favorite corner of the library or internet? A mentor who is open to answering your burning questions? What about the process of learning, especially about subjects that call out to you, is satisfying? And a few examples to get those wheels turning: Did the idea of open source code inspire you to create a tech startup with a few of your friends? What new projects within the company are you most excited to work on? Did getting an internship at an accounting firm inspire you to start each day by checking the markets? Do you participate in a mock trading club that allows you to use the expertise you gather from culling through economic news and analysis online and beyond? On any given Sunday morning, could we find you lost in the literature of Kurt Vonnegut or immersed in a collection of stories by Isaac Asimov? Have you taught yourself to master the compositions of Mozart and Beethoven and break down the songs of Bruno Mars by ear in your spare time? We know someone who did this—really. Show your feathers. Let your freak flag fly within reason, obvs. This prompt is about the pursuit of knowledge and your desire to proactively challenge yourself. Whether you are devouring the classics on your Kindle or nerding out over the perfect cheese for calzone-making, your attachment to a subject may inspire admissions to want to learn more about it…and you. Feared by some, coveted by others, and legendary in its existence; regardless of where you stand on the issue, this was a newsworthy addition to the Common App prompt choices. For years, students have been treating Prompt 1 which asks about your background, etc. Applicants around the world likely let out a big exhale when they saw they could still serve up a big scoop of Prompt 7 to admissions last year. And this year will be no different. What are the stories that come up over and over again, at the dinner table or in the cafeteria with your friends, that might give admissions some insight into who you are and what is important to you? If you had ten minutes alone in a room with an admissions officer, what would you want to talk about or tell him or her about yourself? Who in your life has been your biggest influence and why? How has your family background affected the way you see the world? How has your education contributed to who you are today? Future Plans and Goals Colleges look for applicants with vision and motivation, so they might ask about your goals and aspirations. Briefly describe your long- and short-term goals. You can talk to them. And they're really nice! In fact, there are people who get paid to answer your questions. My best friend was one of them. Your conversation may help you write your essay. They were so nice. Don't ask, for example, if the school has a Biology major spoiler: it does! Don't be afraid to make a connection and simply be a curious human. Get in touch with a current student. What surprised you about [this particular] college? What do most people not know about [insert school]? Research high and low, search the deepest depths of Google or better yet: ask someone who attends the school and find a syllabus for a class you may take at that school. Why does this help? Take this course description, for example, excerpted from a syllabus by and quoted with permission from Dr. Frank Anderson at the University of Michigan: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of reproductive health, both in the United States and from a global perspective. The course will introduce students to cross-cutting themes including 1 historical discourses on reproductive health; 2 the social ecology of reproductive risks e. Additional more specific topics in reproductive health will be addressed including maternal morbidity, contraceptive use, pregnancy, STI care, HIV, abortion care, and violence against women. Through a comparative look at reproductive health needs in a range of diverse social settings, we will critically examine the logic and impact of current domestic and international standards for reproductive health policy and practice. Step 3: Decide on your approach to the essay. While you may not ultimately name all the reasons in your final version, research this many will give you plenty to choose from when you start your draft. How would that curriculum support your interests? Agatha Christie was a nurse. Robert Frost was a light bulb filament changer. The best writers do not only write beautifully, but also integrate their personal experiences and knowledge outside the world of literature. By combining the study of literature, media and perhaps law, I believe the University of Michigan will provide the education necessary for me to evolve as a journalist. I look forward to courses such as Academic Argumentation and Professional Writing, as I believe these will provide me with a firm basis in journalistic writing technique and improve my abilities to write analytically and develop well-supported arguments. Furthermore, the Professional Writing course will teach me how to write in a concise, straightforward style, a skill vital to a journalist. At The College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, I will be able to apply the skills learned in class with media studies in and beyond the classroom. The Honors Program provides an opportunity for independent research into the field of mass media, which will allow for intensive group studies and in-depth research opportunities, and the superb networking opportunity provides the chance to meet and engage with prominent figures in media-related studies, which will provide a deeper insight and knowledge into the field. The Pre-Law Advising Program is interesting because I want to explore the intricacies of law and policies that govern this world. But all these are what UM has to offer me. The various volunteer programs offered by Volunteers Involved Every Week appeals to me, as does the possibility of volunteering at the Boys and Girls Club of Southern Michigan, as I have previous experience with elementary school teaching. And as an international student, I know the pains of learning English as a second language. If you use this first approach, get to the main argument as fast as you can. The clear thesis that provides a path for the essay. Three main reasons and bits of supporting evidence per paragraph.

Choose a book or books and that have affected you deeply and explain why. While you can't predict every essay question, knowing some of the most common ones can give you a leg up on applications.

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Personal Achievements Colleges are looking for students who have achieved in some area of their lives. So you shouldn't be surprised to find essay topics that ask you to brag a little. Describe how you have demonstrated leadership ability both in and out of school. Discuss a special attribute or accomplishment that sets you apart. Describe your most meaningful achievements and how they relate to your future goals. It's like getting to know a person by the people he chooses to hang out with. If you are skeptical, consider the different impression you would have of the candidate who admires a dynamic, colorful athlete compared to someone who looks up to an accomplished but soft-spoken academic. Neither is better nor worse--just different. There are no wrong answers here. Far more important than whom you choose, though, is how you portray that person. In other words, do not choose someone because you think it will impress the committee. Name-dropping is not only very obvious, it is very ineffective. Sorry for the inconvenience. By submitting my email address. I certify that I am 13 years of age or older, agree to recieve marketing email messages from The Princeton Review, and agree to Terms of Use. Find this year's Common App writing prompts and popular essay questions used by individual colleges. The college essay is your opportunity to show admissions officers who you are apart from your grades and test scores and to distinguish yourself from the rest of a very talented applicant pool. If you are using the Common App to apply for college admission in , you will have — words to respond to ONE of the following prompts: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Chris Schaffer, whose research on deep neural activity is not being done anywhere else in the world. I freak out at the possibility of helping him develop a tool to look at multiple brain areas at the same time. Though I have long aspired to study at Cornell, when I visited and sat in on Neurobiology and Behavior II, it made me all the more determined. Her animations of neurotransmitters crossing a synapse and new synapses forming in neuron clusters kept her students engaged in a way I have not seen in any other classrooms. I want to go to Cornell because of teachers like her. During my visit I also enjoyed talking with Kacey about her experiences in the college scholars program. I loved that she had studied the effects of circus and gymnastic performances, like Cirque Du Soleil, on therapy for children with neurological disabilities. I am very excited by the idea of combining neuroscience with something like the effects of learning a classical language on developing brains. Many studies have shown the plethora of positive effects of being bilingual, but not much research has been done on classical languages. I have been studying Latin for over seven years, and I have experienced firsthand the positive effects. This is the program I would create for my college scholars project. Cornell is also the only university I am interested in that offers a speaking course in Latin: Conversational Latin. For the past six years, I have rarely had to translate more than a few sentences at a time from English to Latin, never truly experiencing the unique grammatical features of Latin, such as intricate word play by Catullus in his Odes, that drew me so much to this language. I would love to supplement my knowledge by being able to formulate my thoughts in Latin and actively immerse myself in the language. I am really excited about learning the language as it was meant to be learned, as well as the new perspective it will provide me on Latin rhetorical artifacts. As a kid who loves inventing, enjoys interactive learning, and wants to speak a dead language, I know Cornell is where I want to be. I wonder if my roommate will mind if I bring my EEG? How this essay is similar to the first approach: He begins with a short intro and solid thesis; both work well. He weaves back and forth between what he wants and what the school offers. What sets this essay apart: The four examples that name how the school is unique give us a really clear sense of how Cornell is a great fit for this student. Word limit: Reflecting on your own interests and experiences, please comment on one of the following: 1. Intellectual engagement 2. The Common Good 3. Connection to place On the first dawn of the summer, I found myself in a familiar place: sitting awkwardly in the back of a crowded bus full of rowdy twelve year olds. Using the river as a natural learning laboratory, I taught them about pollution and industrialization, urban design and remediation strategies. That summer, through my work in environmental education, I discovered the power of place. I realized that in a changing world, places really are the best storytellers. I find myself doing the very thing I was teaching: investigating the rich stories behind a place. Why does this essay work? But want to know the main thing that sets this essay apart? Instead, the author found one really good reason: Both he and Bowdoin are deeply committed to investigating place. This focus was particularly apropos for this student, as he planned to major in Environmental Science. Because he used a value as the central theme, this essay is primarily about the author. This works because he stays connected to the central themes, which are nature and storytelling. So we relax. How can you write an essay like this? So take a peek at what the application has in store for you, absorb what these prompts are really asking, and then forget about them really! If this sounds like you, then please share your story. What about your history, personality, hobbies, or accomplishments might be worth highlighting for an admissions officer? It can be something as small as seeing an episode of a television show are you living life in the Upside Down? Some questions to ask yourself as you brainstorm: What about my history or background sets me apart from my peers? How do I define myself? How do the people who are closest to me define me? What have I achieved that has been integral in molding my character and ambitions? What, in my seventeen years on this earth, has helped shape the person I am today? Does your crazy, dyed-blue hair define you? Did going to a Picasso exhibit inspire you to start an art collection that has since expanded beyond the borders of your bedroom? What are the challenges and rewards of having same-sex parents? Or of being raised by your siblings? Or of being part of a family made up of stepsisters and stepbrothers? Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? We have always believed that essays about overcoming obstacles are most effective when they focus more on solutions than problems. Applicants should aim to showcase qualities like resilience, determination, and humility. The obstacles you choose to explore can vary widely in nature, especially with the recent additions that allow students to explore challenges and setbacks in addition to failures. They can be as serious as being tormented by bullies, as ingrained as the financial issues that have plagued your family for years, or as seemingly pedestrian as a mistake that costs you a tip while waiting tables. Still, if you can isolate an incident of trial in your life and illustrate how you learned from it, this can be a rewarding prompt to explore. Some key questions to consider: How do you deal with hardship? What qualifies as a challenge or setback in your life and world? Are you the kind of person who can rebound and turn every experience, good or bad, into one from which you can learn something? What experiences might illustrate this quality? And was there a silver lining? And a few examples to think about: Has a lifelong battle with stuttering ultimately increased your overall confidence and allowed you to participate in social activities and public forums without self-judgment? Did a series of setbacks on your road to becoming a child actor introduce you to screenwriting, your professional goal and biggest passion? Did your failure to follow directions lead you to a botched home science experiment root beer explosion!