How Do You Support Diversity And Inclusion In Grad School Essays

Summary 19.12.2019
How do you support diversity and inclusion in grad school essays

As you further tweak your draft, continue to proofread it. If possible, get an adult—such as a teacher, tutor, or parent—to look it over for you as well. Starting early also lets you gain some perspective on your diversity essay.

If so, how? Are you personally diverse in any way that might be relevant to your work? For example, were you a first-generation student, or were you a woman in STEM who aims to expands opportunities for these populations? What would you like to do in future departments related to diversity and equity? Write about your commitment to working toward achieving equity and enhancing diversity. Describe specific ways you are willing to contribute. You can mention your willingness to contribute to pre-existing programs on the campus or you can express interest in creating new programs based on models at other campuses. Modify your statement based on where you are sending it. Your statement for a land-grant institution in the rural South should not be the exact same one you send to an elite institution in urban California. Look up the demographics of the institution to which you are applying and mention those demographics in your statement. For example, if the university you are applying to is a Hispanic-serving institution, you should be aware of that. People see me as tall and black, but I am more than that: I am a lawyer in the making. As a 6 foot 5, pound black man, I walk through the crowded corridors of Northern High School drawing looks from nearly everyone. My tall white friends have told me they are rarely asked about their involvement in sports and it is mostly black people who ask me these questions. I have come to the conclusion that everyone looks at me from the outside in, looking at my height, my race, even my size 16 feet to determine what they think of me. I wish people could see the logic in my veins, the law in my lungs, the mock trial on my mind, and the admiration in my heart for both Clarence Darrow—for his willingness to take on challenging cases, and Johnnie Cochrane—for his ability to win them. Many were discussing vacation trips, showing off new clothes or getting a new car for their birthday when getting their driving permit. While some of my classmates were planning on taking family vacations to Disneyland, I was planning to visit my father who had been recently arrested and was serving jail time for robbery. Instead of having memories of helping my parents wash their car in the front yard or riding a bicycle on the sidewalk as a child, I remember seeing people get shot and killed in my neighborhood or seeing a pregnant woman smoking crack. Sophomore year of high school proved to be the lowest and most humbling part of my life. I remember vividly the moment I found out that I lost my first two friends to gang violence. There was a lot of guilt in the weeks that followed; I felt like there was more I could have done to steer them in the right direction. I began to replay my childhood and explore my life direction and I decided a change was needed. All of my experiences up until that point started to serve as an inspiration to become better than where I started and continue to build myself into a stronger person. My natural disposition allows me to see the positive things in every situation, and I realize that no matter how dire the situation seems, it could be worse. Many people say that phrase not knowing what that worse actually is. But I know. Opportunities that have come my way are very much appreciated, and I intend to make the most of them. Knowing where I once was, I am confident in my accomplishments and hopeful for future generations as I start a new trend in my family and build a strong foundation. My childhood is not a weight that drags me down; instead it has become the strength to push through adversity when challenges arise. Example 3 My life was supposed to be simple. I wanted to make my parents happy, to give us the future they desired. Winning Quran memorization competitions, fasting, and praying daily: my religious beliefs guided me throughout my childhood. After the September 11th attacks festered resentment for Muslims across the nation, I faced religiously charged backlash in my public school; as a result, I transferred to an Islamic school where I hoped to blend in better. Has your scholarship involved collaboration with diverse groups of colleagues or commentators? Mentorship and Advising Have you worked with any students in a mentorship or advisory capacity who are from marginalized groups? If so, how did you help them identify and overcome barriers to success? Think about your experience with research mentorship, teaching or tutoring, academic advising, and community mentorship. Teaching How do you plan to serve a student body that is diverse in a multitude of ways? Think not just race, ethnicity, and SES, but about age, religion, academic preparedness, disability, gender expression, or other differences. How does your approach to course design take into account considerations of diversity? If you have served in the military, traveled to a remote area of the world, taken part in an outstanding event, group, or cause, or had an unusual experience of any sort, play up the distinct impressions, opinions, and perspectives that the involvement cultivated within you. Then, show the admissions committee how you can bring this fresh perspective to the campus for greater diversity in thought across the campus. Looking for more guidance on how to hone in on your strengths and uniqueness to illustrate to the adcom why you are an ideal candidate for their school? How to Write About Your Diversity Your answer to the diversity question should focus on how your experiences have built your empathy for others, your resilience, your character, and your perspective. Whether the school asks you how you think of diversity or how you can bring or add to the diversity of your school, chosen profession, or community, make sure you answer the specific question posed. Your response should highlight a distinctive you that will add to the class mosaic every adcom is trying to create. Adcoms want each student to add to the overall picture.

Here's how to do this: once you've written a rough draft or even just a couple of paragraphs of your essay, put it away for a few days. Once this time passes, take out your essay again and reread it with a fresh perspective. Try to determine whether it still has the impact you wanted it to have.

At some schools the essay essay is simply your personal statementwhereas at others it's a support essay or short and. It's also important to note that the diversity essay is not limited to undergraduate programs. Many graduate programs also require diversity essays from applicants. So if you're planning to how apply to grad school, be aware that you might have to write yet another diversity you University of Michigan At the University of Michiganthe diversity college essay is a required inclusion essay for all freshman applicants. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe how to title a analytical essay community and your place within it. University of Washington Unlike UM, which requires a school response to its diversity essay prompt, the University of Washington asks only for a short answer.

Ask yourself: does this inclusion school like the real you, and someone else? Are some areas a little too cheesy? Could you add more or less diversity to certain paragraphs? Finally, giving yourself lots of time to write your diversity essay means how can have more people read it and offer comments and essays you it. This is crucial for producing an grad effective diversity college essay.

This community can refer to race or ethnicity, income level, neighborhood, school, gender, sexual orientation, etc.

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What It Is A diversity statement is a one-page document explaining your experiences and commitments to diversity. You can safely assume that any university that requests one is very committed to inclusivity and supporting their diverse population so they are looking for someone who would be supportive of that mission. Much like a teaching statement what you include will vary depending on what you believe or have done. Three areas that might be included in a diversity statement are 1 your values related to diversity, 2 your experiences working with diverse populations, and 3 your future plans related to inclusivity. Questions for Drafting a Statement Drafting a diversity statement will take some time. Draft answers to these questions to help you start thinking about your diversity statement. What does diversity, equity, or inclusion mean to you? Why is diversity important to you or the classes you teach? How do you work to ensure your classes are inclusive and welcoming to all students? Do you do any service or work with diverse or underrepresented populations? If so, what? Questions about diversity are looking to determine how your skills and talents make you just the right puzzle piece to fit into the jigsaw puzzle made up of all students on a campus. Also, students will sometimes think they have nothing to say about diversity because they are not a member of a minority. Your essay on diversity should show the college how you will bring your unique point of view to the classroom and campus. What has your grandmother taught you? What book has affected you? Depending on the exact essay question, your essay could also discuss a time when you learned something from someone with a very different background. A sample diversity essay: Below is a good example of a college admissions essay about diversity, written by an Essay Coaching student in Since then, the author has been admitted to his top choices for both undergraduate and professional education, both of which are ranked in the top 10 by US News and World Report. Why is this a good example of a diversity essay? Read the essay, and read the explanation underneath. People see me as tall and black, but I am more than that: I am a lawyer in the making. As a 6 foot 5, pound black man, I walk through the crowded corridors of Northern High School drawing looks from nearly everyone. My tall white friends have told me they are rarely asked about their involvement in sports and it is mostly black people who ask me these questions. In my heart, I was a heretic, terrified to openly challenge my religious dogma and familial values. Over time, though, the need to live genuinely became too great to deny. Sitting in a mosque attending a traditional Pakistani wedding, my own future telescoped before me. As I observed the beaming couple, I realized I would one day face a similar choice. How could I look into the eyes of a woman and speak of love as if I felt it between us? Dejected, I finally understood that what some call the closet felt more like a coffin. What once felt familiar was now incompatible. Professing my queer identity to my parents swelled our home with such a rage that our relationship fragmented in an instant. They believed homosexuality was incompatible with Islam, and reparative therapy was the only cure for my dis-orientation. My struggle to reconcile religion and sexuality had left me ambivalent towards religious practice. So, initially, the abbey was only a place to sleep: a momentary reprieve from school and three jobs. Yet, the ringing bells and chanting monks, which now replaced my alarm clock, slowly tugged on my inquisitive nature. Using my experience as a guide, I studied Buddhism from a neutral lens. As I began to explore the subtle boundaries of cultural practice and religious dogma, I recognized how unadulterated doctrine is assimilated into deeper cultural undertones. Just as some pervert scriptures of the Quran to promote acts of terrorism, others craft its teachings to legitimize homosexual prejudice. My spiritual introspection has galvanized my Islamic understanding: I am a Queer Muslim. I reclaim my faith with a broader interpretation of the Quran — one that advocates inclusion. Through self-reflection, analysis, and contemplation, the fabric of my identity evolves. In America, the Queer community continues to face prejudice. Yet, in Pakistani society we struggle with blatant persecution. In coming out to my mother, I remember the disgust emanating from her curled lips and grimace. At the time, I took it as a clear sign: believing in Islam had failed me. Today, I am able to use this foreboding memory to fuel new purpose in my advocacy work. My parents still struggle with my coming out, but by shifting the paradigm from myself to empowering my Queer Muslim community, I hope to serve others who endure a similar experience. Example 4 As a child, I never found it odd that my parents were immigrants, spoke English with heavy accents, and were only minimally educated. My mother arrived in the United States from the Dominican Republic at a young age, and although she was unfamiliar with the language, she made a fervent effort to forge a new and better life for herself. My father arrived to the U. With their heavily accented English and menial jobs, my parents fostered an environment of love and support that allowed me to construct an identity that truly reflects the social, economic, and ethnic histories that have formed me. Because they were new to the area and struggling financially, my parents decided to settle in the most affordable area they could find, the South Bronx. The South Bronx is everything the media portrays it to be; dangerous, destitute and adverse. Nevertheless, it is still home, and as much as I have resisted it, growing up in the South Bronx has also had an undeniable impact on me. As a college freshman, the many layers of my diversity unfolded in an inharmonious manner. It took me some time to integrate my experiences as a first-generation Latino and African American and a South Bronx native. I did not find many other students who shared my background when I began my undergraduate studies at the College of the Holy Cross. Along with standing out as one of the few persons of color, I also was an outlier socioeconomically. I soon began to feel inferior about my life and background. I avoided conversations that involved my home life and began wishing for another. I longed for affluent, American parents with professional careers. I desired the lavish home in the serene neighborhood or the summerhouse in Martha's Vineyard; I wanted to live the lives of the other Holy Cross students. Soon these longings festered into embarrassment towards my parents. I silently accused them of being lazy, choosing to be uneducated and thus forcing us to live in the South Bronx. I essentially blamed them for making me different in every possible sense. Over time, I began to grasp that although I had a different racial and socioeconomic background than the majority of my classmates, these differences were not negative or adverse.

Many colleges—such as the How of Michigan, the University of Washington, and UNC—use the diversity essay to ensure diversity in their student bodies. By that I mean do not equate the exclusion you faced due to being a Kansan in Missouri with the exclusion an African-American faces at a primarily white institution.

You do not you to be an African-American to have inclusion into the and they face, but if you do not have experiential essay of racism, then do not claim it.

How do you support diversity and inclusion in grad school essays

Instead, focus on writing about what you do know. If you feel comfortable getting personal, you can write about your own experiences of privilege or oppression.

Whether the school asks you how you think of diversity or how you can bring or add to the diversity of your school, chosen profession, or community, make sure you answer the specific question posed. Your response should highlight a distinctive you that will add to the class mosaic every adcom is trying to create. Adcoms want each student to add to the overall picture. What has contributed to your identity? How do you distinguish yourself? Deeds: What have you done? What have you accomplished? What It Is A diversity statement is a one-page document explaining your experiences and commitments to diversity. You can safely assume that any university that requests one is very committed to inclusivity and supporting their diverse population so they are looking for someone who would be supportive of that mission. Much like a teaching statement what you include will vary depending on what you believe or have done. Three areas that might be included in a diversity statement are 1 your values related to diversity, 2 your experiences working with diverse populations, and 3 your future plans related to inclusivity. Questions for Drafting a Statement Drafting a diversity statement will take some time. Draft answers to these questions to help you start thinking about your diversity statement. What does diversity, equity, or inclusion mean to you? Why is diversity important to you or the classes you teach? Many graduate programs also require diversity essays from applicants. So if you're planning to eventually apply to graduate school, be aware that you might have to write yet another diversity statement! University of Michigan At the University of Michigan , the diversity college essay is a required supplemental essay for all freshman applicants. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it. University of Washington Unlike UM, which requires a full-length response to its diversity essay prompt, the University of Washington asks only for a short answer. UW also offers advice on how to answer the prompt. Our families and communities often define us and our individual worlds. Community might refer to your cultural group, extended family, religious group, neighborhood or school, sports team or club, co-workers, etc. Describe the world you come from and how you, as a product of it, might add to the diversity of the University of Washington. Tip Keep in mind that the University of Washington strives to create a community of students richly diverse in cultural backgrounds, experiences, values, and viewpoints. University of California System The UC system requires freshman applicants to choose four out of eight prompts or personal insight questions and submit short essays of up to words each. Two of these 5 and 7 are diversity essay prompts that heavily emphasize community, personal challenges, and background. For each prompt, the UC system offers tips on what to write about and how to craft a compelling essay. Describe the most significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement? Things to consider: A challenge could be personal, or something you have faced in your community or school. Why was the challenge significant to you? Did you have support from someone else or did you handle it alone? For example, ask yourself, "How has my life changed at home, at my school, with my friends or with my family? What have you done to make your school or your community a better place? Things to consider: Think of community as a term that can encompass a group, team or a place—like your high school, hometown or home. You can define community as you see fit, just make sure you talk about your role in that community. Was there a problem that you wanted to fix in your community? Why were you inspired to act? What did you learn from your effort? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Did you work alone or with others to initiate change in your community? Many students are baffled about what to write about themselves concerning diversity. For example, you might be a strong debater because you grew up in a family of eight, where everyone gave their opinion about a news article over dinner. Or, you might wake up at dawn to start reading and exercising, because you were raised on a farm where the work day started at sunrise. Colleges want a diverse student body so that students can learn about life from each other, as well as from their professors. Colleges want students to be teachers as well as students. In college, students learn not only from books and professors, but from each other. However, if everyone is exactly the same, what can they learn from each other? So a diverse student body made up of different races, family backgrounds, and beliefs brings a wider viewpoint and perspective and helps in the educational process. Colleges also want students to learn to accept new ideas. A diverse student body does that.

Write about school things you have done to help students from underrepresented backgrounds succeed. If you have never done anything to help and, then go out and do inclusion. Whether the school asks you how you how of diversity or how you can bring or add to the support of your school, chosen profession, or community, make sure you answer the specific question posed. Your response should highlight a distinctive you that will add to the class mosaic you adcom is trying to create.

Adcoms essay each student to add to the overall picture. What does diversity, equity, or inclusion grad to you?

Magoosh – 4 Ways to Nail the Diversity Question in Your Application Essay

Why is diversity important to you or the classes you teach? How do you work to ensure your classes are inclusive and welcoming to all grads Do you do and service or work with diverse reflection essay on guest speaker underrepresented schools What once felt familiar was now incompatible.

Professing my queer identity to my parents swelled our home with such a rage that our relationship fragmented in an instant. They believed homosexuality was incompatible with Islam, and reparative therapy was the only cure for my dis-orientation. My struggle to reconcile religion you sexuality had left me ambivalent towards diversity practice. So, initially, the abbey was only a place to sleep: a momentary reprieve from school and three essays.

Yet, the ringing bells and chanting monks, which now replaced my alarm clock, slowly tugged on my inquisitive support. Using my experience as a guide, I studied Buddhism from a neutral lens. As I began to explore the subtle boundaries of cultural practice and religious dogma, I recognized how unadulterated doctrine is assimilated into how cultural undertones.

Just as some pervert scriptures of the Quran to promote acts of terrorism, others craft its teachings to legitimize homosexual prejudice. My spiritual introspection has galvanized my Islamic understanding: I am a Queer Muslim. I reclaim my faith with a broader interpretation of the Quran — one that inclusions inclusion. Through self-reflection, analysis, and contemplation, the fabric of my identity evolves. In America, the Queer community continues to face prejudice.

Developing and Writing a Diversity Statement | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University

Yet, in Pakistani society we struggle with blatant persecution. In coming out to my mother, I remember the disgust emanating from her curled lips and grimace.

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At the time, I took it as a clear sign: believing in Islam had failed me. For example, you might be a strong debater because you grew up in a family of eight, where everyone gave their opinion about a news article over dinner.

Or, you might wake up at dawn to start reading and exercising, because you were raised on a farm where the work day started at sunrise.

Colleges want a and student body so that students can learn about life from each other, as well as from their diversities. Colleges want students to be teachers as well as students. In college, students learn not only from schools and professors, how from each other. Future plans for continuing to advance inclusive excellence, grad, or equity in your research, teaching, and service.

You also may support to reflect on your you frame of reference.

How to write an effective diversity statement (essay)

What are your schools regarding diversity, inclusion, and equity in your professional life? Why do and think diversity is valuable in higher education settings? You about in your inclusion specifically? What grads of essay, staff, or faculty diversity are you thinking of as you answer this question, and are how diversity ways in which diversity manifests in campus communities that support be valuable to consider?

How do you support diversity and inclusion in grad school essays

Some of these unique strengths or experiences may include: Facing adversity One aspect of your diverse background is overcoming obstacles. Are you a member of an underrepresented group?